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Posts Tagged ‘Louisiana U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary’

Contact:  Jay Culotta
Public Affairs Officer – Northlake Flotilla 4-2
985-845-9366
jay@jay-culotta.com

March 6, 2012

News Release

About Boating Safely Course – March 17th in Madisonville

Madisonville, LA — The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary’s state-approved About Boating Safely course will be taught Saturday, March 17 at the Madisonville Town Hall from 8 a.m. until about 4:30 p.m. The Town Hall is next door to Morton’s Seafood Restaurant on Water Street in Madisonville.

Louisiana law states: “No person born after January 1, 1984, shall operate a motorboat powered by a motor in excess of ten horsepower, unless he has successfully completed a boating safety class approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators. A person who has completed an approved boating safety class shall be in possession of evidence of such completion when operating such a boat.” This law also applies to operators of personal water craft (PWCs), however, no person under the age of 16 may operate a PWC at any time.

“The Coast Guard Auxiliary’s course is valid for all jurisdictions,” explained Jay Culotta, public affairs officer, Northlake Flotilla. “Those who complete the course receive a certificate, as well as a wallet card to be carried by those subject to the age requirement. Without such proof, an operator is subject to large fines and possible termination of the voyage and seizure of the vessel.”

Students will learn about the different types of boats and personal water craft, safety equipment the Coast Guard requires to be aboard a vessel while underway, the rules of the road such as which boat has the right-of-way under varying operating conditions, how to dock a boat, trailering and towing, what the various aids to navigation are and how to read a marine chart.

The cost is $25.00, online or by telephone, before March 17, and at the door, $30.00. Discounts are available for multiple family members who share materials. The fee includes the About Boating Safely course book, a CD of the course for later review and other valuable material explaining federal rules.

Register online at http://uscgaux-northlake.com/boating-safety-2/boating-safety or call 985-845-9366 and leave your contact information if you receive the voice mail message. Other times and dates are available at http://uscgaux-northlake.com/2012-calendar.

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Contact:  Jay Culotta
Public Affairs Officer – Northlake Flotilla 4-2
985-845-9366
jay@jay-culotta.com

February 4, 2012

News Release

About Boating Safely Course – February 11th in Covington

Covington, LA — The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary’s state-approved About Boating Safely course will be taught Saturday, February 11 at Northlake Flotilla’s office located upstairs at the Tammany Home Center, 2101 N. Hwy. 190, Suite 200, Covington, LA, from 8 a.m. until about 4:30 p.m.

Louisiana law states: “No person born after January 1, 1984, shall operate a motorboat powered by a motor in excess of ten horsepower, unless he has successfully completed a boating safety class approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators. A person who has completed an approved boating safety class shall be in possession of evidence of such completion when operating such a boat.” This law also applies to operators of personal water craft (PWCs), however, no person under the age of 16 may operate a PWC at any time.

“The Coast Guard Auxiliary’s course is valid for all jurisdictions,” explained Jay Culotta, public affairs officer, Northlake Flotilla. “Those who complete the course receive a certificate, as well as a wallet card to be carried by those subject to the age requirement. Without such proof, an operator is subject to large fines and possible termination of the voyage and seizure of the vessel.”

Students will learn about the different types of boats and personal water craft, safety equipment the Coast Guard requires to be aboard a vessel while underway, the rules of the road such as which boat has the right-of-way under varying operating conditions, how to dock a boat, trailering and towing, what the various aids to navigation are and how to read a marine chart.

The cost is $25.00, online or by telephone, before February 11, and at the door, $30.00. Discounts are available for multiple family members who share materials. The fee includes the About Boating Safely course book, a CD of the course for later review and other valuable material explaining federal rules.

Register online at http://uscgaux-northlake.com/boating-safety-2/boating-safety or call 985-845-9266 and leave your contact information if you receive the voice mail message. Other times and dates are available at http://uscgaux-northlake.com/2012-calendar.

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This is why we teach boating safety classes and stress over and over and over… WEAR YOUR LIFE JACKET!

http://www.nola.com/news/index.ssf/2011/10/coast_guard_calls_off_search_f_1.html

 

Our thoughts and prayers are with the surviving family members.

On August 4th we celebrate the 221st birthday of the U.S. Coast Guard.

Our Service started as a vision of Alexander Hamilton who wrote, “a few armed vessels, judiciously stationed at the entrances of our ports, might at a small expense be made useful sentinels of the laws.” In 1790, President George Washington brought Hamilton’s vision to life when he signed an act of the First Congress creating the Revenue Cutter Service.

Through our pride, professionalism and heroism we have carried Hamilton’s design forward, all the while taking on increased responsibilities. We have broad authorities that allow us to serve the United States in ways that no other agency can do: we protect those on the sea, we protect America from threats delivered by sea, and we protect the sea itself.

Every day I am sustained by the enthusiasm, excitement and pride of being a member of our Service. For 221 years we have worked together to overcome challenges that often seem insurmountable. Sometimes the challenge is to return from a mission safely. Other times, it is to rescue and return survivors back to safety. The tenth anniversary of 9/11 next month is one of many reminders of why we must remain vigilant and stand a taut watch to ensure the safety, security and stewardship of our Nation and its waters.

As we celebrate Coast Guard Day I encourage the entire Coast Guard Family – active, reserve, civilian, retired, auxiliary and contractors – to take a moment and honor those who served before us to make the U.S. Coast Guard the premier maritime service it is today.

We are Coast Guardsmen. We work as a crew. We serve as a family.

This is our way. This is who we are. This is what we do.

Happy Birthday-Semper Paratus,

Admiral Bob Papp

Watch this short video to find out the common objections for not wearing life jackets and SOLUTIONS to solve the objections.

 

U.S.C.G. Auxiliary In “Sink Or Swim, Inflate Your Life” from Circle Of Six on Vimeo.

This link is from nola.com.

http://www.nola.com/traffic/index.ssf/2011/07/boat_collisions_increasing_as.html

Two things – WEAR YOUR LIFE JACKET and TAKE A BOATING SAFETY COURSE!

Boating Safety Course

 

 

As I mentioned in my last post, I have mixed emotions about commenting on this story because it could be perceived that I am “piling on” or being critical.

I AM NOT! I am trying to help people realize that Boating is SERIOUS business and EDUCATION is the key to SAFE BOATING!

Here is the latest from WWL TV on the accident.

http://www.wwltv.com/news/northshore/Girl-in-boating-accident-died-from-striking-her-head-125912413.html

http://www.wwltv.com/news/northshore/2nd-deadly-boat-crash-in-weeks-raises-conerns-over-blind-turns-125919974.html

The young man featured in the video (second link), Adam Gettys,  was the first on the scene and brought back the survivors from the smaller boat that contained Samantha, her sister and her two cousins and uncle. Other relatives of mine were involved in the search for Samantha’s body and helping her family.

PLEASE take a Boating Safety Course, either from our Flotilla in the Mandeville, Covington, Madisonville area, or from someone in your local area.

Here are links, to our class

About Boating Safely Class

and to a locator for a class in your area.

http://dev02.cgaux.org/generic/classes.php?flo=081

We also do FREE Vessel Safety Checks, which might have prevented this tragedy because we not only make sure your boat is safe and that you have the required equipment, we help you understand WHY these items are required and how to use them in an emergency.

FREE Vessel Safety Checks

Contact:  Jay Culotta
Public Affairs Officer – Northlake Flotilla 42
985-845-9366
jay@jay-culotta.com

http://uscgaux-northlake.com

July 9, 2011

News Release

Propeller Strikes May Prove Deadly

WASHINGTON – Each year boat propellers are a leading cause of boating accidents. In many cases, the victims were in the water and near the stern of the vessel.

Passengers moving around a boat or improperly seated may fall overboard when the vessel is moving too fast for prevailing conditions. People can be ejected from a boat for a variety of reasons including, a collision with another boat, hitting a submerged object, rogue waves, and sudden acceleration/deceleration in speed

Contributing factors to propeller strikes accidents are operator inexperience, incompetence, negligence, and operating under the influence of alcohol or other substances. Bow and transom riding are also inherently dangerous.

The Coast Guard Auxiliary suggests turning the engine off and keeping the boat tied to the dock while passengers are boarding or disembarking. The vessel operator should alert passengers prior to speed change or when large waves are imminent. While a boat is underway everyone should be seated and wearing a Coast Guard approved life jacket.

Steps to take for a Man Overboard situation
1. A person seeing someone fall overboard should shout “Man Overboard Port or Starboard side (left or right will do)”
2. Throw a life ring, life jacket or other floatable device to the person.
3. Turn the boat toward the side the person fell overboard.
4. Circle around keeping the individual in sight.
5. Slow down. Turn the engine off at least a boat length away to avoid propeller strike
6. Bring the person aboard and render first aid as needed, checking for additional injuries.

The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is the uniformed volunteer Component of the United States Coast Guard created by an Act of Congress in 1939. The Auxiliary supports the Coast Guard in nearly all of the service’s missions.

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Contact:  Jay Culotta
Public Affairs Officer – Northlake Flotilla 42
985-845-9366
jay@jay-culotta.com

http://uscgaux-northlake.com

July 8, 2011

News Release

Madisonville – Vessel Examiners from Northlake Flotilla 42 will be conducting FREE Vessel Safety Checks for anyone who either has their boat in Marina Del Ray, or who brings it to Bent Marine on a trailer.

The purpose of the VSC is to make sure your vessel is safe and complies with all Federal and State requirements. We check your vessel for FREE, do not issue tickets if you lack something and do NOT report it to any law enforcement. We give you a list of the things you need to get to comply and then come back later, at your convenience to re-inspect those items you lacked, OR we issue you a decal that will certify that you have been inspected and passed.

(However, the decal is NOT a guarantee you will not be stopped or boarded. It is only certification that you met the requirements at the time of the inspection, which could have changed.)

An example of some of the items checked include:

  • Life Jackets
  • Registration and numbering
  • Navigation lights
  • Ventilation
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Distress signals (flares, horn, etc.)
  • Battery cover and connections

All of these items are currently required by state and federal laws and, if missing or non-operating, can result in a citation if your vessel is inspected by the Coast Guard.

Click HERE to perform a Virtual Safety Check and find out what things we will be looking for and if you might pass. You may also go HERE first to learn more about what constitutes a Vessel Safety Check and then do the Virtual Safety Check from the same page.

The Vessel Safety Check gives you a risk-free way to check that you meet the legal minimums and to potentially avoid a citation later.

All this is covered in About Boating Safely, our most popular safe boating class and the one that complies with the Louisiana requirements for a boating safety class. For more information, click HERE.

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To contact a Vessel Examiner for questions or to schedule a VSC, please complete this form.

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The 4th of July and Labor Day typically account for at least one-third of all boating related accidents and fatalities nationwide.  In light of the dangers, the U.S. Coast Guard and its Auxiliary volunteers are offering seven tips to stay safe while boating this upcoming holiday and the rest of the summer:

·  Always wear a life jacket:  While in many areas of the country it’s hot and steamy, don’t be tempted to forgo wearing a life jacket. National statistics consistently show that up to 80 percent of those who died in boating accidents were not wearing life jackets.

·  Make sure your boat is properly equipped and that required equipment is functioning properly:  The 4th of July is sometimes the first and only time people venture out on the water after dark.  Make sure your navigation lights work so you can be seen.  Better yet, request a free Vessel Safety Check (www.vesselsafetycheck.org) to make sure your boat has all the legally required and recommended equipment onboard.

·  Be prepared for emergencies: Take the time to familiarize your crew with basic emergency procedures, and show them how to contact authorities for help via marine radio or cell phone.  If you boat in an area that requires flares, make sure they are up-to-date, but never use flares as a form of fireworks.  This is a class D felony, punishable by up to six years in prison and up to $250,000 in fines, plus the cost associated with the false distress.

·  Boating and Alcohol do not mix:  Along with decreasing the operator’s ability to make good judgments, drinking alcohol negatively affects the ability of passengers to respond in the case of an emergency on the water.  The effects of the sun, wind, waves and a boat’s motion in the water can also add to an operator’s impairment.  Intoxicated boaters can face both federal and state charges with penalties of up to one year in prison and up to $100,000 in fines.

·  File a Float Plan with a friend:  A float plan for a boater is similar to a flight plan for a pilot.  It lists who is going, where you’re going, what the boat looks like, and when you expect to be back. Share it with friends who will be staying ashore and instruct them what to do, in the event that they don’t hear from you within a reasonable time of coming home.  Visit http://floatplancentral.org for a complete plan, along with instructions.

·  Keep a sharp lookout for other boats, the weather, or anything that is unusual:  The Coast Guard asks the public to be more aware of their surroundings, including carefully watching the weather, and celebrating responsibly.  Report any emergencies to local authorities by calling 911 or Very High Frequency-FM radio Channel 16.  Any suspicious activity that might involve terrorism should be reported to America’s Waterway Watch at 1-877-24-WATCH.

·  Practice the 3 Cs – Caution, Courtesy, and Common sense:  Exercise caution, especially in close quarter maneuvering with other boats.  In such situations, slow speeds are better.  Be courteous to your fellow boaters and use common sense.  Don’t cut people off at the launch ramp!

By following these seven simple tips, you could save your life or the lives of your passengers.